Sunday, July 2, 2017

PIX-N-TOONZ-N-STUFF 070217


SUNDAY 070217 SUNDAY 070217 
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July 2 is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 182 days remaining until the end of the year.

On This Date
1776 The Continental Congress passed a resolution that "these United Colonies are, and of right, ought to be, Free and Independent States."
1881 President James A. Garfield was fatally shot by Charles J. Guiteau at the Washington railroad station. (Garfield died on Sept. 19.)
1890 Congress passed the Sherman Antitrust Act.
1908 Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American Supreme Court justice, was born in Baltimore.
1932 Democrats nominated New York Gov. Franklin D. Roosevelt for president at their convention in Chicago.
1947 An object that the Army Air Force later said was a weather balloon crashed near Roswell, N.M. Eyewitness accounts gave rise to speculation it might have been an alien spacecraft.
1961 Author Ernest Hemingway, 61, shot himself to death at his home in Ketchum, Idaho.

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The parents of terminally-ill baby Charlie Gard are ‘utterly distraught’ and facing fresh heartbreak after losing their final appeal in the European Court of Human Rights.
Chris Gard, 32, and Connie Yates, 31, wanted to take their 10-month-old son – who suffers from a rare genetic condition and has brain damage – to the US to undergo a therapy trial.
Doctors at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London, where Charlie is being cared for, said they wanted him to be able to ‘die with dignity’.
But the couple, from Bedfont, west London, raised almost £1.4million so they could take their son to America but a series of courts ruled in favour of the British doctors.
It comes after specialists at Great Ormond Street said therapy in the US is experimental and will not help and added that life support should stop.



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Rush: Trump Playing With Media Like 'A Red Laser Pointer' and a Cat!!!


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GOOD LORD! HOW CRAZY CAN PEOPLE BE??





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FNN-Late last night Greensburg police received a phone call from a worried resident saying "she heard very concerning sounds coming from an alley way near her house". Upon arrival officers instantly heard the noise she was talking about but never expected what they where about to see. Upon investigation they found a 21 year old male dressed as a clown.....


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OK, IT'S A COMMERCIAL BUT FUNNY.



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Why Birmingham should be your next Southern food trip.
In the 1870s, enterprising folks caught wind of Birmingham’s mineral-rich land, and its role as the South’s industrial center was quickly cemented. Formed of rural farmers and migrants seeking steady employment in the city’s steel mills and blast furnace, it had boomed at such a high rate that it became known as "Magic City," a place that appeared out of nowhere, like magic. But the Great Depression in the 1930s and the Civil Rights movement, in the 1950s and '60s, left the burgeoning town divided. “White flight” and the decline of the railroad system left the downtown desolate and bleak.
In Birmingham, it was about survival, and there was little room left for the culturally rich agendas enjoyed by its more established Southern sisters (Charleston is two centuries older, Memphis five decades and New Orleans is somewhere in between).
Today, the fight for inclusion is a louder cry, and in Birmingham it’s championed by the culinary scene, a group of chefs, bartenders and diners who are marching forward together. Young professionals who flew the coop for larger cities are returning home, and restaurateurs are recognizing Birmingham as the capital of the new South. There are nooks and crannies and entire city-block grids in downtown’s contiguous neighborhoods — Pepper Place, Five Points South, Avondale — that are unrecognizable from a few years ago.




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THIS HAM REALLY SMOKED IT!!
When Dave Tolley got a ticket to see The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson in 1985, he never imagined it would be the day his life would totally change. Tolley had played piano for years but was still waiting on his big break. He got that chance when the musical act Johnny Carson had previously booked cancelled at the last minute. So Carson decided to turn to the audience.
Dressed in a t-shirt and sandals, Tolley nailed a version of Memories for the Broadway show “Cats.” The audience roared with delight and he got the attention of Johnny Carson who invited him back on the show a few months later, this time as a featured guest. Tolley’s appearance catapulted his career and he went on to write seven musicals as well as compose music for Disney theme parks.





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Because these innovations in transportation were still in their infancy in 1815, however, most Americans ate what they grew or hunted locally. Corn and beans were common, along with pork. In the north, cows provided milk, butter, and beef, while in the south, where cattle were less common, venison and other game provided meat. Preserving food in 1815, before the era of refrigeration, required smoking, drying, or salting meat. Vegetables were kept in a root cellar or pickled.
For those who had to purchase their food, one record notes the following retail prices in 1818 in Washington, D.C.: beef cost 6 to 8 cents a pound, potatoes cost 56 cents a bushel, milk was 32 cents a gallon, tea 75 cents to $2.25 a pound. Shoes ran $2.50 a pair. Clothing expenses for a family of six cost $148 a year, though the record does not indicate the quality of the clothes.



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In between the gleaming high-rises and manicured lawns of Iskandar, a vast new city taking shape on peninsular Malaysia’s southern shore, lie swathes of still untamed scrubland and dusty construction sites. But when it is completed, by a projected date of 2025, the special economic zone dubbed ‘Malaysia’s Shenzhen’ will be three times the size of adjacent Singapore. The zone has been touted as a means of bolstering the fortunes of both countries — giving the city-state the hinterland it lacks, and allowing Malaysia to leverage its neighbour’s financial expertise. Iskandar is part of a growing nexus of economic ties between the two countries, whose relations were frayed — but not quite severed — by Singapore’s ejection from the Malaysian federation in 1965. Najib Razak, Malaysia’s prime minister, has said his country could be New Jersey to Singapore’s Manhattan, while Singapore’s central bank chief has floated the idea of a single economic zone covering Iskandar and the neighbouring city-state which would provide investors with an “integrated production and services base” in Southeast Asia.


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